Interdisciplinary PhD program in Structural and Computational Biology and Quantitative Biosciences

From Mice, Clues to Microbiome’s Influence on Metabolic Disease

Photo of Alan Attie

The community of microorganisms that resides in the gut, known as the microbiome, has been shown to work in tandem with the genes of a host organism to regulate insulin secretion, a key variable in the onset of the metabolic disease diabetes.

That is the primary finding of a study published Feb. 14 in the journal Cell Reports by a team led by University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers Alan Attie and Federico Rey. The new report describes experiments in mice showing how genetic variation in a host animal shapes the microbiome — a rich ecosystem of mostly beneficial microorgannisms that resides in the gut — and sets the table for the onset of metabolic disease.

“We’re trying to use genetics to find out how bugs affect diabetes and metabolism,” explains Attie, a UW–Madison professor of biochemistry and a corresponding author of the study.

To read more about this research, see the press release below.

URL: http://news.wisc.edu/from-mice-clues-to-microbiomes-influence-on-metabolic-disease/